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[Re: Aircraft Smoking Ban]

Date: 04 Sep 1987 (est.)
Length: 28 pages
TI00451053-TI00451080 [Err]
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Abstract

I would like to take this opportunity to personally thank you for voting the airline smoking ban Your continued efforts and opposition to such moves in the future is greatly appreciated by the entire tobacco industry The facts are all in Smoking on

Fields

Box
5617. Miscellaneous Issue Material
Airline Smoking Ban 88
DOT Appropriations Bill
NYSA numbers
0044 B1793 02C
Type
Letter
Author
Carlisle, Allen
Lowry, J D
Garrison, R D
Sanford, B W
Boman, Stan
Recipient
Gramm, Phil
Bentsen, Lloyd M
Glenn, John H
Kaslch, John R
Metzenbaum
Ford, Robert Q
Akaka, Daniel K
Buechner, John W
Boren, David L
Boren
Nickles, Donald L
Dole, Robert
Nickles, Don
Boren, David
Named Person
Akaka, Daniel K
Boman, Stan
Boren, David L
Carlisle, Allen
Carlisle, Mary A
Durbin
Ford, Q
Hbzenbaum, Howard M
Inhofe, James M
Kimura, Wendell K
Lawton, Chiles
Mary
Nickles, Donald L
Suzuki, Norman H
Woodson, Walter N
Named Organization
Congress
Department Of Transportation
House And Senate
House Budget Committees
House Of Representatives
National Transportation Safety Board
Pilots Association
Senate
Senate Finance And The House Ways And Means Committees
Tobacco Institute
Transportation Safety Board
Thesaurus Term
airplane
legislation
smoking restriction
Congress
Author (Organization)
F. & F. Tobacco Products

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Page 1: TI00451053
F. & F. Tobacco P 'oducts ~ ~ ~ Septet 4 ~ House of Representativ~ /ashi~gton, ~ _2/ Dear Co~g~ss~ B~5t~: " • 1987 I would like to take this opportunity to personally, thank you for voting ~gainst the airline smoking ban. Your continued efforts and opposition to such moves in the future is greatly appreciated by the entire tobacco industry. The facts are all in. Smoking on airlines is already sharply restricted. The current restrictions of separating smokers and non-smokers are satisfactory and reasonable to the majority of all passengers. There is no evidence that smoking on aircraft may pose a "fi~-~-hazard" in the skies. The list of facts goes on and on. The very real concern is the countless number of people that will eventually be forced out of business and out of jobs. When our nations' economy is so sluggish, what do we intend to do with the tobacco farmers, the manufacturers, the distributors and their employees? Have the lawmakers of our country given this any serious thought? It would also be wise to note the tremendous ~mount of revenues generated by the taxes already imposed on our industry. This includes federal and state taxes right down to the state and lohal sales taxes. We both know what a financial strain our state and federal ftlnds are presently .u~d~r. Where can we expect these lost revenues to come from, if not from the already over-burdened, over-taxe~ and over-b=.-nned tobacco industry? When all is said and done, smoking fits into the category of "common ccurtesy", as does a great deal of other areas in our society. Smokers are, generally, courteous. Let's give them the same respect and freedoms we extend to non-smokers. This often leads me to wonder, what will be next? I would ask for your consideration and continued support on any future restrictions regarding smoking and the tobacco industry. Sincerely• • ~,aymond Fickey u~ner RJFIfw T10045-1053
Page 2: TI00451053
505-A W, ~lst Street -- ?'/9-4,188 BRYAN, TEXAS 77B0l September 4, 1987 Senator Phil Gramm, U.S.S. U. S. Senate Washington, DC 20510 Dear Senator Gramm: I would like to take this opportunity to address ~he issue of the ban of smoking on airlines. I am strongly opposed to this ban. Your efforts and opposition to such bans would he greatly appreciated by the entire tobacco industry. The facts are all in. Smoking on airlines is already sharply restricted. The current restrictions of separating smokers and non-smokers.are satisfactory and reasonable to the majority of all passengers. There is no evidence that smoking on aircraft may pose a "fire hazard" in the skies. The list of facts goes on and on. The verylreal concern is the countless number of people that will eventually be force~ out of business and out of jobs. When our nations' economy is so sluggish~ what do we intend to do with the tobacco farmers, the manufacturers, the distributors and their employees? Have the lawmakers of our country given this any serious thought? It would also be wise to note the tremendous amount of revenues generated by the taxes already imposed on our industry. This includes federal and state taxes right down to the state and 16cal sales taxes. We both know what a financial strain our state and federal funds are presently under. Where can we expect these lost revenues to come from, if not from the already over-burdened, over-taxed and over-banned tobacco indust~l? When all is said and done, smoking fits into the category of "common courtesy", as does a great deal of other areas in our society. Smokers are, generally, courteous. Let's give them the same respect and freedoms we extend to non-smokers. This often leads me to wonder, what will ~ next? I would ask for your consideration and continued support on any future restrictions regarding smoking and the tobacco industry. Sincerely RJF/fw T!004~-1054
Page 3: TI00451053
F. & F. Tobacco Products 505-A W. 31st" Street" ~ 7"/9-4188 BRYAN, TEXAS "]'1'801 September4, 1987 Senator Lloyd M. Bentsen, U. S. S. U. S. Senate Washington, DC 20510 Dear Senator Bentsen: I would like to take this opportunity to address th@ issue of the ban of smoking on airlines. I am strongly opposed to this ban. Your efforts and opposition to such bans would be greatly appreciated by the entire tobacco industry. The facts are all in. Smoking on airlines is already sharply restricted. The current restrictions of separating smokers and non-smokers are satisfactory and reasonable to the majority of al__!l passengers. There is no evidence that smoking on aircraft may pose a "fire hazard" in the skies. The list of facts goes on ~nd on. The very real concern is the Gountless number of people that will eventually be forced out of business and out of jobs. When our nations' economy is so sluggish, what do we intend to do with the tobacco farmers, the manufacturers, the distributors and their employees? Have the la~akers of our country given this any serious thought? It would~be wise to note the tremendous amount of revenues generated by the taxes already imposed on our industry. This includes federal and state taxes right do~n to the state and lohal s~les t~xes. We both know what a financial strain our state and federal funds are presently under. Where can we expect these lost revenues to come from, if not from the already over-burdened, o~er--t~ed and over-banned tobacco industry? When all~is said and done, smoking fits into the category of "common courtesy", as does a great deal of other areas in our society. Smokers are, generally, courteous. Let's give them the s~me respect and freedoms we extend to non-smokers. This often leads me to wonder, what will be next? I would ask for your consideration and continued support on any future restrictions regarding smoking and the tobacco industry. RJF/fw T10045~055
Page 4: TI00451053
F. & F. Tobacco Products 50~.~ W. ~lst S~et ~ 77~188 BRYAN, TEXAS 77803 Mr. Roger L. Mozinqo Director Tobacco Action Network 1875 I Street, NW- Suite 800 Washington, DC 20006 h,hllh,,lh,,lh,,,lh,~,l,ll
Page 5: TI00451053
STATE SEP 11 L~BI September 8, 1987 Senator John H. Glenn, Jr., U.S.S. U. S. Senate Washington, D. C. 20510 Dear Senator Glenn, I urge you to oppose further restrictions on Airline Smoking bans. As a frequent flyer, I am opposed to such measures. I believe further smoking bans would cause significant administration problems for the airlines and passengers alike. Once agaCn, I urge you to oppose the smoking hans on the Airlines. Sincerely, Westerville, Ohio ~3081 Ti0045-1057
Page 6: TI00451053
September 8, 1987 Honorable John R. Kaslch, M.C. U. S. House of Representatives Washington, D. C. 20515 Dear Honorable Mr. Kaslch, I urge you to oppose further restrictions on Airline Smoking bans. As a frequent flyer, I am opposed to such measures. I believe further smoking bans would cause significant administration problems for the airlines and passengers alike, Once again, I urge you to oppose the smoking bans on the airlines. Sincerely, 13 .... /~ ¢,...// 878 Thlrlwall C~u.r~t Westerville, OH ~3081 T!0045-1058
Page 7: TI00451053
September 8, 1987 Senator Howard M. HB~zenbaum, U.S.S. U. S. Senate Washington, DC 20510 Dear Senator Metzenbaum, I urge you to oppose further restrictions on Airline Smoking bans. As a frequent flyer, I am opposed to such measures. I believe further smoking bans would cause significant administration problems for the airlines and passengers alike. Once again, I urge you to oppose the smoking bans on the airlines. Sincerely, Westerville, OH 43081 T!0045-1059
Page 8: TI00451053
September 3, 1987 WASHINGTON, D.C. 205|0 Mr. Robert Q. Ford 350 42nd Avenue St. Petersburg Beach, Florida 33706 Dear Robert: Thanks for letting me know of your opposition to an increase in cigarette excise taxes. I read your comments with interest, and I appreclate having your thoughts on this matter. On May 6th of this year, the Senate passed the bud@et resolution which I proposed for 1988. That measure had one major a~m: to eliminate the deficit by 1991. Although our spending plan proposed a modest revenue increase, it made no specific assumptions as to how these revenues should be raised. While the Senate ind House Budget Committees are responsible for proposing the level of revenues to be generated each year, the specific revenue options are the responsibility of the Senate Finance and the House Ways and Means Committees. Since that time, the House and Senate have enacted a compromise budget resolution. It does not go as far as the package that I proposed to eliminate the deficit over the next four years. Nevertheless, it does represent a responsible mix of savings derived from domestic spending reductions, from restraint in military expenditures, and from revenues to be used for deficit reduction. The deficit under this plan would fall by $37 billion in 1988, with total savings through 1990 equaling $151 billion. This final budget resolution recognizes the fact that the federal deficit is a product of spending and revenue choices which, in my view, must be tackled if we are going to be successful in our efforts to eliminate Federal deficits. When the President presented his FY 1988 budget to Congress on January 5th, more than half of the savings proposed came from additional revenues. That was a strong indication to me that even the Administration believes the deficit cannot be erased through spending cuts alone. For the last six years, revenue shortfalls have played a major role in our runaway deficits. For example, changes in tax policy since 1981 will translate into revenue losses next year of a full $137 billion. In addition, net interest costs for having to borrow to cover those losses will add an additional $54 billion to the 1988 budget deficit. Stated another way, without the tax cuts we have experienced since 1981, instead of a deficit of $171 billion, we could have a surplus of $20 billion. This reinforces my belief that an increase in revenues is needed to help reduce the deficit. Although I am firmly convinced that greater revenues are needed to better control our deficit position, I am mindful of your concerns with specific reference to cigarette excise taxes. TI00454060
Page 9: TI00451053
'Mr. Robert September Page 2 Q. Ford 3, 1987 With kind LC/Sbs regards, I am Most sincerely LAWTON CHI LES T!0045-1061
Page 10: TI00451053
WALTER N. WOODSON Communications Manager State Activities THE TOBACCO INSTITUTE 202/457-~814 800/424-9876 1875 I Street, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20006 TI0045-1062

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