Jump to:

Guildford Misc

12-page document: WESTI~II.N STER HOUSE 7 MILLB2~.'qK

Date: No date
Length: 12 pages
100432981-100432992
Jump To Images
guildford_misc 0100432981-0100432992

Fields

Document Images

Text Control

Highlight Text:

OCR Text Alignment:

Image Control

Image Rotation:

Image Size:

Page 1: 0100432981
WESTI~II.N STER HOUSE 7 MILLB2~.'qK LONDON SW1P 3JE U.C.W.8. 1 6 JUN1980 2 o oo A¢~ .~.~..~,= .......... n''~ "'t"/"",'", ...... RLOE/MJL/GFT 12th June 1980 TO ALL NO. l'S OF ASSOCIATED COMPANIES WORLD HEALTH ORGANISATION This year, as you know, the WHO is making special efforts to develop its international anti-smoking campaign. The attached document aims to summarise the current scope of WHO, to highlight key aspects of its future plans and to suggest some implications for BAT companies. I hope this information will be of interest and provide a useful input =o your thinking. ,/" Ro Art. ~D OD w
Page 2: 0100432982
WORLD HEALTH ORGANISATION The WHO is making special efforts in 1980 to propagate anti-smoking information and =o encourage Governments to introduce" anti-smoking regulations. The rapidly developing nations are a priority target for the WHO's activities. The attached notes indicate the progress of the WHO's international anti- smoking campaign so far this year, highlight the organisation's plans for the future and outline some implications for BAT companies. CONTENTS PAGE Implications for BAT companies of =he current WHO anti-smoking campaign. World Health Day, 7th April, 1980 : Summary of the response so far to the WHO campaign. 33rd World Health Assembly, Geneva, May 1980 : Summary of main points. WHO international campaign : "Health Hazards of Smoking" - Key points from the Director-General's progress Report. Action by the Industry - some examples. 12
Page 3: 0100432983
- i - WORLD HEALTH ORGANISATION IMPLICATIONS FOR BAT COMPANIES OF THE CURRENT WHO ANTI-SMOKING CAMPAIGN. The position in some countries has changed within a short period and anti- smoking controls are being introduced as a direct result of the ~O progran=e. We must be prepared for further activity on the part of WHO, backed by increased funds and greater co-operation by Governments. Therefore BAT companies should continue to: I. familiarise themselves with the issue and its implications. 2. co-operate with other tobacco companies to establish agreed policies through =he formation of industry associations where appropriate. 3. develop further their communications with Government, particularly with Departments of Health, Industry, Agriculture and Finance. 4. monitor public opinion about smoking and health. 5. exchange information with Millbank so that the issue can be monitored on a wide basis. 6. brief management and employees as appropriate so that they are aware of the company's position. 7. review the implications for marketing, promotional, personnel, product development, public relations and other policies. If companies can achieve these aims, they will then be in the best position =o anticipate new developments in smoking and health, to manage the issue, to re-assure employees and to exploit marketing and other opportunities which arise. C2.~ ./.
Page 4: 0100432984
-2 - WORLD HEALTH DAY, APRIL 7TH, 1980 The response so far to the WHO international anti-smoking campaig~ SUMMARY I* The level of response has varied but there has been considerable support for WHO in Africa where the propaganda campaign has been followed by anti-smoking regulations in territories such as Nigeria and Kenya. , 2. Main thrust of the attack on tobacco is : - Smoking causes disease - Incidence of smoking related illnesses is rising in the developing world - In developing nations, the tobacco industry uses advertising methods which are not acceptable in western countries - Cigarettes on sale in developing nations are much more dangerous than in the West - Tobacco growing prevents the cultivation of food - The use of tobacco for flue-curing is causing shortages of wood. . Governments in developin$ countries seem to be more fully aware now of the smoking and health issue. BAT companies will wish to be prepared to manage the effects and the opportunities. AFRICA In Nigeria extensive coverage has been given by the media this year. Typical of the themes followed is the centre page spread in the Daily Times of 2nd April : "Smoking Kills: The Choice is Yours". Propaganda has had an unsettling effect upon tobacco farmers, distributors and employees. A ban on smoking in public places has been introduced in Kenv____~a and anti- smoking regulations are likely to be introduced this year in Nigeri__~a. txO Cr~ ./.
Page 5: 0100432985
" 3- This topic has been taken up extensively in Zambia, Sierra Leone, Kenya and the Camerouns. Other typical headlines are: - "Watch That Cigarette! Are You Not Smoking Yourself to Death?" Daily Mail) - "Give Up Smoking Now" (Cyprus) - "A Plague From the West" (Sierra Leone, Daily Mail) "Fighting The Man-Made Dragon" (Sierra Leone, Daily Mail) - "Cigarette Advertising should be Reduced" (Kenya, Times) - "Does Smoking Reduce Your Life Span?" (Kenya, Standard) (Zambia FAR EAST AND NEW ZEALAND In Sri Lanka press articles have also been based largely on the WHO package and have carried headings such as: - "Smoking; A Plague That Threatens the World" (Ceylon Daily News) "Smoking and the Third World" (Sun) The articles have dealt with smoking in general rather than with the position in Sri Lanka. Television coverage has been less extensive. On World Health Day, April 7, two out of three leading English-language dailies carried anti- smoking articles. In Bangladesh, a seminar was held in Dacca by the WHO. It was opened by the Health Minister who called upon the audience to encourage smokers to give up. Several newspapers carried anti-smoking pieces, commemorating the event. Some of these articles were based on the WHO press kit. Few reports have appeared so far in Thailand but the Bangkok Post has put forward the view that more lower tar cigarette brands should be imported. The Post has also used the WHO line "West Dumps its High Tar Cigarettes in the Third World". In New Zealand World Health Day was a non-event, but the anti-smoking feeling in that country needed no boosting from the WHO. It is already a very serious t,4 CO ./.
Page 6: 0100432986
-4 " problem for the industry. The South China Morning Post and The Star in Hong Kong both carried news of a WHO report about high tar cigarettes being exported to developing countries, otherwise there appears to have been little response to the WHO. LATIN, CENTRAL AMERICA, CARIBBEAN In Chile, the effect of anti-smoking propaganda has been tempered by the Director of the Panamerican Health Office, Dr. Acuna who has identified the virtues of smoking in moderation and who has acknowledged the importance of tobacco to the economy. Anti-smoking articles in Costa Rice cite tobacco as, "The greatest enemy to health" and the subject is described also in "La Nacion" as, "The tragedy of tobacco". Whilst the Venezuela press also made used of WHO material, the magazine "Enterese" took an independent line with an article entitled, "Smoking does not produce cancer". The campaign associated with World Health Day was launched by the Minister of Sanitation and Social Health, Dr. A. Benzecry, with a short television speech. Television was also used in the West Indies with two interviews with Trinidad doctors. The press response has been limited so far. CANADA) UK In Canada the Montreal Gazette reported the WHO campaign as did several other papers in different parts of the country. The media generally appears to have provided only a limited response. In the United Kingdom the media generates anti-smoking material as a mass production process. It was difficult to detect any increased level of activity to mark World Health Day. Predictably, there were articles in the medical press and short paragraphs in the regional newspapers. The Daily Telegraph briefly told readers that "Shame is the spur to s=op smoking" and typical of regional newspapers, the Oxford Mail reported that the WHO was launching a "World drive to shame smokers in quitting". CYD
Page 7: 0100432987
- 5 - 33RD WORLD HEALTH ASSE~fBLY~ GENEVA, SWITZERLAND, MAY 1980 Resolution on"Health Hazards of Smoking" ~ul~mary WHO is changing its role from being an assistance organisation to being a highly active body in its own right. Delegates expressed concern at cigarette promotion in developing as well as developed countries, particularly where youth is concerned. WHO must take the lead in co-ordinating activity with other international agencies. Crop diversification in tobacco growing areas is being studied. Removal of smoking should be given a high priority by all countries. ./. CD CID lz~ ,,O C~D
Page 8: 0100432988
- 6- PROPOSERS The resolution on "Health Hazards of Smoking" was proposed by the following countries and adopted unanimously: Austria Italy Monaco Portugal Canada Kenya New Zealand Qatar Denmark Kuwait Nigeria Saudi Arabia Finland Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Norway Sweden Guyana Luxembourg Pakistan Switzerland Iceland Malaysia Peru Tanzania Venezuela A. Resolution expressed: I. concern at the aggressive promotional drives for the sale of cigarettes that occur in developing as well as developed countries, thus inducing new generations to take up the habit of smoking. 2. encouragement at the existence of total bans, restrictions or limitations on tobacco advertising in several countries. J 3. encouragement at greater awareness of the harmful health effects of cigarette smoking in many countries. 4. need for long term national and international strategies to combat smoking. B. Member states urged to: I. strengthen and initiate smoking control strategies, with special emphasis on education, particularly with respect to youth and on measures to ban, restrict or limit advertising of tobacco products. 2. support WHO. C. Director-General asked to: I. further develop an effective WHO action programme on smoking and health, defining priorities and lines of responsibility. -~_'lD CID CO
Page 9: 0100432989
-7 2. ensure W~O takes the leading role in international co-operation with other UN agencies and others, and particularly in crop diversification in tobacco growing areas in collaboration with FAO. 3. collaborate with member states in efforts to reduce smoking. 4. consider the tobacco problem in developing countries. 5. mobilise financial and other resources for the anti-smoking programme. D. Dr. Masironi of WHO answered questions about collaboration with FAO: I. WHO is carrying out a study on health costs as part of an FAO pilot study on crop substitution. 2. The FAO study is being done in several countries to establish the cost benefits of tobacco growing and trading. The aim is to produce a mathematical model for use by member states. 3. FAO activities are hindered in this respect because no member state has asked for the work to be done. Dr. Masironi appealed for approaches to be made by FAO members. ADDITIONAL POINTS i. WHO is collecting information on smoking trends. This international clearing house activity is being carried out by the US Office of Smoking and Health (sic) and the WHO network. 2. World Health Day, 1980 was claimed to have been a success as a stimulus for anti-smoking activity and as a springboard for future information, educe=ion and legislation. 3. A special fund exists to finance anti-smokin$ activities. Coded "VD" it is for voluntary donations for designated purposes. &. Proposed that problems of smokin$ in the workplace should be identified as the subject for a joint study with the ILO. 5. Reiterated that the removal of smoking should he given high priority O P,.O ~.0 CO ".0 bv all countries because it is seen as an obstacle to the achievement
Page 10: 0100432990
of WHO's goal of "Heal~h for all by the Year 2000". 6. A list of "meaningful indicators", including smokin$, is to be issued to show the degree of progress towards "Health for all". 7. WHO is changing its role from that of an "assistance orsanisation" to a hishly active co-operative body. Much re-organisation is in progress within WHO, within its regional network and in its working relationships with member states. O ,.24 F~O ,-O

Text Control

Highlight Text:

OCR Text Alignment:

Image Control

Image Rotation:

Image Size: